C++ Switch Statement | Examples

Use the switch statement to specify which of several code blocks should be run.

switch statement
switch(expression) {
  case x:
    // code block
    break;
  case y:
    // code block
    break;
  default:
    // code block
}

This is how it functions:

  • The switch expression is only once evaluated.
  • The values in each scenario are compared to the value of the expression.
  • If there is a match, the matching piece of code is executed
  • The break and default keywords are optional; more information will be given later in this chapter.

The following Example identifies the name using a number:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
  int day = 4;
  switch (day) {
  case 1:
    cout << "Rohit";
    break;
  case 2:
    cout << "Ram";
    break;
  case 3:
    cout << "Papun";
    break;
  case 4:
    cout << "Google";
    break;
  case 5:
    cout << "Rupesh";
    break;
  }
  return 0;
}
OUTPUT:
Google

C++ exits the switch block when it encounters the break keyword.

This will halt further code execution and case testing within the block.

When a match is made and the work is over, a break is necessary. More testing is not necessary.

A break “ignores” the execution of the entire rest of the switch block’s code, which can save a significant amount of time during execution.


If there is no case match, the default keyword defines some code to execute:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main() {
  int day = 4;
  switch (day) {
    case 6:
      cout << "Today";
      break;
    case 7:
      cout << "Yesterday";
      break;
    default:
      cout << "Day after tomorrow";
  }
  return 0;
}
OUTPUT:
Day after tomorrow

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